K.K. Downing “I Slowed Down Because People Weren’t Keeping Up”

During a recent appearance on the Cobras & Fire Podcast, former Judas Priest guitar player K.K. Downing was asked what he thought of Ian Hill’s recent comments that Richie Faulkner (K.K.’s replacement) has added new energy to the band “I’m not totally happy about what’s being said. Ian seems to be making it seem as if none of the  fans are missing K.K. and Richie’s brought a new energy to the band.  I’m going Ian, dude.  On that last tour I was the energy.  I slowed down because people weren’t keeping up with me.”  He continues  “Rob’s reading his auto-cue.  He’s slowed down.  Glen’s going over there for a beer in between every song.  I’m thinking Ian, get a grip with yourself mate.  I mean you just replaced the energy with some energy.”

You can hear the entire interview below.

The book “Heavy Duty: Days and Nights in Judas Priest” by K.K. Downing with Mark Eglinton comes out September 18th on DaCapo Press.

“Heavy Duty” is a memoir by the cofounder and former lead guitarist of heavy metal giants Judas Priest

Judas Priest formed in the industrial city of Birmingham, England, in 1969. With its distinctive twin-guitar sound, studs-and-leather image, and international sales of over 50 million records, Judas Priest became the archetypal heavy metal band in the 1980s. Iconic tracks like “Breaking the Law,” “Living after Midnight,” and “You’ve Got Another Thing Comin’” helped the band achieve extraordinary success, but no one from the band has stepped out to tell their or the band’s story until now.

As the band approaches its golden anniversary, fans will at last be able to delve backstage into the decades of shocking, hilarious, and haunting stories that surround the heavy metal institution. In Heavy Duty, guitarist K.K. Downing discusses the complex personality conflicts, the business screw-ups, the acrimonious relationship with fellow heavy metal band Iron Maiden, as well as how Judas Priest found itself at the epicenter of a storm of parental outrage that targeted heavy metal in the ’80s. He also describes his role in cementing the band’s trademark black leather and studs image that would not only become synonymous with the entire genre, but would also give singer Rob Halford a viable outlet by which to express his sexuality. Lastly, he recounts the life-changing moment when he looked at his bandmates on stage during a 2009 concert and thought, “This is the last show.” Whatever the topic, whoever’s involved, K.K. doesn’t hold back.

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